Author Topic: Welcome! Join the chat!  (Read 2734 times)

Offline Rakune

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Welcome! Join the chat!
« on: August 24, 2016, 03:07:51 am »
Hello! Welcome, if you are new (Or not!). There are currently three places where you can meet and talk with people who play X-PirateZ.

1) The forum, duh.

2) Discord Channel.
https://discord.gg/7f58BnS

3) IRC Channel!
https://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=x-piratez

All of them have active members who will happily answer any question you have, and you can always hang out and share your experience with the game!
« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 05:59:01 am by Rakune »

Offline ivandogovich

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Re: Unofficial Piratez Extended Discord Channel!
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2016, 09:06:04 pm »
icymi:

https://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=x-piratez

Nothing against Discord, but we've had an IRC up for a while now, and there are a few regulars who hang out there.

Offline Rakune

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2016, 05:59:51 am »
Can we make this sticky or that Dioxine/Meridian makes a official thread about the places where people can come and chat with other players? New people joined the IRC because you posted it in my thread actually

Offline Dioxine

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2016, 03:03:06 pm »
Done, it's a sticky now.

Offline BetaSpectre

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2016, 08:28:39 am »
Oh there's a chat?

Offline hellrazor

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2017, 03:59:03 pm »
Before using discord it really helps to read and understand the privacy terms of service: https://discordapp.com/privacy

To be honest, i wouldn't use such a service. to much data sniffing, IRC is better =)

Offline Solarius Scorch

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2017, 05:10:30 pm »
Before using discord it really helps to read and understand the privacy terms of service: https://discordapp.com/privacy

To be honest, i wouldn't use such a service. to much data sniffing, IRC is better =)

I can't really see anything I'd care about, but I am no expert and I understand your point. Could you specify which points are worrying?

But anyway, it's not like I have a choice... 100% of Piratez-related interaction (apart from this forum) is on Discord.

Offline ivandogovich

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2017, 05:17:42 pm »
But anyway, it's not like I have a choice... 100% of Piratez-related interaction (apart from this forum) is on Discord.

Yep. Discord has become the default XPirateZ and OXCE+ dev hangout space for brainstorming, player questions, and just generally talking about anything.

My weblink to the XPirateZ channel for those interested:

https://discordapp.com/channels/217792132633591809/217792132633591809

(and yeah, can all be done through a browser with no need for installing a client on your PC)

Offline legionof1

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2017, 08:42:35 pm »
The issues that i see in discords policy are that it's quite nebulous and wide covering on several points. Normally such wide areas would be refined in following paragraphs and clauses. This document is however quite short and open to interpretation. The worst case is they can freely hand the info they gather(sufficient data about your device to track/hijack it at a whim) and any info you provide them(the full content of messages+any linked social media) to anyone they care too. The only restraint is "in a manner consistent with this privacy policy".  Given the briefness of the policy itself that clause means almost nothing.

Mostly this sort of thing is not a problem and pretty common in internet concerns trying to function worldwide. Just be aware that a data breach could occur and cost you the machine you used discord on, even without the app. Also note that anything you say could end up anywhere and you MIGHT have no legal recourse to defend yourself.

99.99% percent of the time nothing will ever happen but the one in a million will supremely bite the end user in the butt. Be cautious and aware of the possibilities.

I use discord frequently myself but i know how to mitigate the risks to my hardware and accept that the internet is the internet, anything i say will live forever and be interpreted as stupidly as possible by somebody.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2017, 08:49:13 pm by legionof1 »

Offline sectopod

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2017, 06:48:27 am »
once i suspected an organisation to work on partly illegal terrain. i subscribed to their newsletter to get a sense of what they are offering. then they got hacked. the partly illegal business practices of the organisation were uncovered. and the list of subscribing email addresses got published on the web. i was very glad my real name didn't show up there, or an email address i used elsewhere, as i created an freemail account for just this purpose. other people who subscribed with their personal addresses had to face a public and media outrage, maybe even consequences on their jobs.

I totally was in favor of what happened to that organisation. the account i used also received an email by the hackers basically telling me, that if i want to protest the events that happened, i should write down my protest and stick it up my ass. this and the publication of the list was a nice, small payback to the people profiting from this organisation or interested in its services.



EVERYTHING YOU REVEAL TO THE INTERNET ABOUT YOURSELF, CAN END UP IN PLACES YOU WOULD NOT HAVE NIGHTMARED ABOUT!

(it probably already did, considering that data about us on facebook or google is used to tailor political or consumer messages towards us)





Offline Dioxine

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2017, 07:06:29 am »
It doesn't matter all that much, if one is to believe the latest WikiLeaks report. It's not even an issue of CIA having hacked basically every notable platform, OS and community protocol. Even more worrying is the fact that all these hacking tools have long since leaked out and are available to anyone who can steal or buy them. The best way not to get f*cked seems to be not worthy of being f*cked; then, the worst can happen is becoming part of a botnet (or several). Anonymity on internet is a myth.

Not saying that one shouldn't be careful and guarded by security software; but such protection only makes sure you won't get swamped by random malware and adware. If someone wants to break it, they will.

Offline Juku121

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2017, 06:15:44 pm »
It's not quite as bad as that. It's been the guarded opinion of crypto experts for a while now that cryptography itself has not been broken. Most breaches come from unpatched vulnerabilities, malicious service providers (that includes Google!) and the stupid trend of exposing all your life to the internet.

It doesn't matter all that much, if one is to believe the latest WikiLeaks report.

Anonymity on internet is a myth.

I see no reason not to believe it, but how you arrive at that conclusion is really... backwards. The source says CIA and those who use their tools spy on you by hacking your device on the OS/hardware level, this by definition requires you not to be anonymous anymore. Even the NSA data centers can't hold the whole planet's phone calls yet.  8)

It's basically business as usual, except shady botnet types have been replaced by NSA/CIA/[your acronym of choice] and these people take the business of weaponizing SW/HW vulnetabilities a lot more seriously and professionally.

I'd say casual anonymity is a myth and maintaining it in the face of a resourceful opponent takes serious effort, but it's still quite possible. But indeed the best way to do it is to stay below the radar.

If someone wants to break it, they will.

Depends. If a nation-state wants to break it, they have good odds of succeeding. But if we take e.g. the FBiOS debacle at face value, even that may not be sufficient.

Offline Dioxine

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2017, 06:38:50 pm »
Cryptography amounts to not much if your software and hardware is full of backdoors... Which is exactly how it is with most normal users and machines.

It doesn't take the resources of a nation-state to use these, either; the most worrying part of the WikiLeaks report are clear indications that all these cutting edge hacking tools  are leaking out; and how they wouldn't, they're just software, and software is easy to copy. There also has been an increasing number of high level hacks done by various criminals, from social networks to banking networks; it's strange how these get little attention in the MSM.

Naturally there are systems that are very secure and hard to break in; it is easier to secure one own's private machine than a whole network. However, not so long ago my friend's computer got hacked. And he is a skilled user, paranoid and meticulous about his cybersecurity (as much as one can be while still using Windows, at least), and no-one important.

Offline Juku121

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2017, 07:51:56 pm »
Cryptography amounts to not much if your software and hardware is full of backdoors...

Crypto keeps the playing field level. Unless you go full-blown conspiracy-theory-mode, most software suffers from unintended vulnerabilities rather than outright backdoors. These get patched, new ones are introduced/discovered and attack vectors need ro be reworked, while still bypassing as much crypto as possible. If you suddenly broke integer factorization, or some popular hash functions etc., this step goes away and you can dispense with hacking devices and just grab all the traffic/physical data from your target. Then privacy is truly gone and buried.

Hardware backdoors are still mostly a proof-of-concept thing, and largely restricted to operations involving nation-states when they’re not. Fiddling with physical objects is difficult and expensive, compared to software.

It doesn't take the resources of a nation-state to use these

But it does to develop them, or at least close enough. And I was more referring to the fact that a nation-state can supplement remote hacking with a lot more, in terms of techniques, tools, physical access and legal authority.

and software is easy to copy.

Yes, and that's the lesson from the crypto wars of the 90s the US government is hell-bent on unlearning.

Banks have always had a strangely relaxed stance regarding cybersecurity, for that matter.

However, not so long ago my friend's computer got hacked.

I'm curious, do you mean someone deliberately hijacked/infected his computer in particular?

Offline sectopod

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Re: Welcome! Join the chat!
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2017, 08:50:40 pm »
It doesn't matter all that much, if one is to believe the latest WikiLeaks report. It's not even an issue of CIA having hacked basically every notable platform, OS and community protocol. Even more worrying is the fact that all these hacking tools have long since leaked out and are available to anyone who can steal or buy them. The best way not to get f*cked seems to be not worthy of being f*cked; then, the worst can happen is becoming part of a botnet (or several). Anonymity on internet is a myth.

Not saying that one shouldn't be careful and guarded by security software; but such protection only makes sure you won't get swamped by random malware and adware. If someone wants to break it, they will.

My point is, I can protect best against a breach of any kind, if I don't give away information about myself in the first place. e.g. on my calendar app which synchronizes with an online service, i never write anything someone would be able to make sense of. if i go to the general doctor i write w0, if i go to the dentist i write w10 etc ... I don't want anyone to know what doctors i am consulting because I always anticipate, that everything that is stored about me on the internet or even my phone already being copied and channeled to places, the knowledge about would make me shiver.

Like legionof1 wrote:
99.99% percent of the time nothing will ever happen but the one in a million will supremely bite the end user in the butt. Be cautious and aware of the possibilities.

Which i agree with, when we are talking about illegal activity, hacking, pishing, data theft, etc.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2017, 08:55:00 pm by sectopod »