OpenXcom Forum

OpenXcom => Offtopic => Topic started by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 03, 2019, 12:37:07 am

Title: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 03, 2019, 12:37:07 am
Hi, folks! I'm working on an XCOM inspired fantasy game. It is not a carbon copy, and the most striking difference is that I don't use RNG, leading to numerous different design decisions. For example, instead of chance to hit, to penetrate high defense armor, attacker has to spend action points. This allows for example using some at first glance useless unit, with a lot of action points, like say bird, to distract defender, while slow heavy hitter does the damage. The next difference is the shift towards spellcasting and terraforming map. For example, if player has imp worker, it can dig underground passage into a prison under castle, free inmates there and then attack the castle from underneath. The other way would be flying over moat (with flight spell or flying creatures), teleport there, pass through walls with wraiths (which also see through walls), create elevation to reach castle wall. Obviously, player can just storm the heavy guarded front gate.

The game engine also supports portals and large doors (you cant have a proper castle with puny little door). And AI uses them too.

Still the game borrows a lot of elements from Gollop's games, especially Lords of Chaos and XCOM. I.e. there is chryssalid style monsters and a raise dead spell producing undead units, which are very resistant to non-enhanced attacks. The game has a world map, invasion threat and randomly generated maps (cities, dungeons, etc...), but I also plan adding ability to play as bad guys instead.

Do you have any suggestions or wishes for such a game? For example, what do you think should happen if two units teleport into the same place or if unit tries to teleport into the fog of war ends up teleporting into a wall? For now, just strongest unit survives (i.e. the wall).

(https://i.imgur.com/Z5QBTue.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/af8IRwV.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: luke83 on January 03, 2019, 12:52:55 am
Very nice mate, i would like to test your game then i could you my 2 cents worth :), please PM me if you want a game tester.

Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Valken on January 03, 2019, 09:00:14 am
Beautiful pixel artwork! Would love to see a demo video once you have a working alpha build.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Yankes on January 03, 2019, 01:15:09 pm
In deed it looks promising. Overall right now I only see couple of things that could be improved in graphics.
First of all this selection box should be have some graphics not some green lines (or it is only debug thing?).
Second is to show not visible tiles as black, right now edge of visibility look too "sharp" (tiles look like they hangs in space because you do not see other around).
Some thing like that is done by OXC. Probably best version would be if tile is show as black only if it is adjacent to visible tile. With this edges will look more pleasing and you will see this star background too

btw all star "spikes" should have same orientation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction_spike
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 03, 2019, 04:55:50 pm
First of all this selection box should be have some graphics not some green lines (or it is only debug thing?).
The cursor is a paceholder which will be eventually replaced with proper graphics.

Second is to show not visible tiles as black, right now edge of visibility look too "sharp" (tiles look like they hangs in space because you do not see other around).
Some thing like that is done by OXC. Probably best version would be if tile is show as black only if it is adjacent to visible tile. With this edges will look more pleasing and you will see this star background too
Yeah. Fog of war needs future improvements. But for now it is of lower priority, than implementing features. I'm curious how Magic & Mayhem and XCOM games implement FOW. I did it though bruteforce raycasting. But I doubt original XCOM used such resource intensive routine.

Anyway, the game has Facebook page. I will post future updates there:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/298041333699422/
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Yankes on January 03, 2019, 06:28:34 pm
Yeah. Fog of war needs future improvements. But for now it is of lower priority, than implementing features. I'm curious how Magic & Mayhem and XCOM games implement FOW. I did it though bruteforce raycasting. But I doubt original XCOM used such resource intensive routine.
This depends on number of "rays" you use and more importantly what limitation you can impose on this.
First of all this will be only calculated when unit move to next tile, this mean this will happens only once per second, in this time you could render normal graphic using raycasting.

Some time ago I added new light engine to OXCE that propagate more realistically (walls block it). Each source of light was separately calculated.
This was a lot more computation intensive that simple FOV calculation. Example of hardest case was opening doors when on one side of it rage fire storm.
Then I would need update around 20 source of light for some large area. Naive implementation give 1s lag each time you open/close door.
After adding lot of limits and optimizations now this is not visible (at least on my hardware :D).

https://github.com/Yankes/OpenXcom/blob/OpenXcomExtended/src/Battlescape/TileEngine.cpp#L399
https://github.com/Yankes/OpenXcom/blob/OpenXcomExtended/src/Battlescape/TileEngine.cpp#L503
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Solarius Scorch on January 03, 2019, 08:23:58 pm
It all looks very pretty and intriguing, but I assume you want honest feedback, so...

The "I don't use RNG" is a complete deal breaker to me. It's fine in a card game, but a combat strategy? Sorry, but no.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 04, 2019, 01:07:19 pm
Naive implementation give 1s lag each time you open/close door.
Yeah. That will get even more involved if you remove map height restriction. And suddenly you need to use something like octress to traverse the map. For example, I use use height=32, and that already forces me to use a lot of hacks, to avoid traversing every tile for FOW and pathfinding. Gollop was genius to implement that for Amiga! (an 80ies computer)

The "I don't use RNG" is a complete deal breaker to me. It's fine in a card game, but a combat strategy? Sorry, but no.

1. Random decisions are still allowed for AI. If AI has two similarly powerful spells, you will never know which one AI will use (unless you manage to lock AI's ability to cast that spell). Or say what route AI units will take to attack player.
2. Maps are randomly generated, with items also placed randomly.
3. Player creature and spell selection is also slightly randomized. There could be no elven mercenaries available at that time, because they are at war with dwarves. Or shortage of ingredients for that flight spell.

So there RNG is still here, just the non annoying kind. So if you want to polymorph that orc into a chicken, you will always get a chicen and not a dragon. So yeah, it is more of a puzzle game.

And the game is designed with multiplayer in mind, so RNG is a no-no for that. Unless you want players to insult each other about being lucky n00bs.

Although I still plan to add additional RNG-mode for players wanting that kind of experience of having to miss 50% of time. But that is of lower priority, because there already a lot of games with such RNG.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Solarius Scorch on January 04, 2019, 01:50:54 pm
Thanks, I understand your decision.
It's just not a game for me... I don't care for e-sport mechanics. :P
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 25, 2019, 06:28:34 pm
Thanks, I understand your decision.
It's just not a game for me... I don't care for e-sport mechanics. :P
Yup. It is hard to make a game that will cater to everyone, so for now I'm trying to make something unique.

I also plan adding different campaign modes, beside scenarios and XCOM style: one roguelike, and the other similar to what you see in Cortex Command. In future I hope making it into a very modable open source engine, which could be used to implement any similar game, from games like Final Fantasy Tactics like to Dwarf Fortress and Minecraft type games.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: FeruEnzeru[RETIRED/I QUIT] on January 25, 2019, 11:34:09 pm
@Nikita_Sadkov
In future I hope making it into a very modable open source engine, which could be used to implement any similar game, from games like Final Fantasy Tactics like to Dwarf Fortress and Minecraft type games.
Aw that's a good one! :)
Man, i wish XCOM:EU2012/EW (not Long War 1) was moddable til 2020s or 2030s instead of 2019/this year. :-\
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on January 27, 2019, 01:44:42 pm
Aw that's a good one! :)
Man, i wish XCOM:EU2012/EW (not Long War 1) was moddable til 2020s or 2030s instead of 2019/this year. :-\
I checked this XCOM reboot when it came, and found that the reboot is completely different game from original XCOM. It seems devs looked over screenshots from original XCOM and made unrelated game with the same name. Nice graphics, but everything else is static and scripted so tightly, you may as well watch a TV show instead. It is like visiting paleontology museum vs traveling with time machine to see real dinosaurs. Even worse story happened with System Shock reboot, where devs showed nice demo, made selfies with Warren Spector, collected money and ran away with them.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Stoddard on January 27, 2019, 03:51:43 pm
I checked this XCOM reboot when it came, and found that the reboot is completely different game from original XCOM. It seems devs looked over screenshots from original XCOM and made unrelated game with the same name.

There's project lead's interview floating on the net where he talks about making an true sequel prototype, presenting it and then Sid Meier showing him the light. Pathetic, really. But explains the mess.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 06, 2019, 03:10:01 pm
Made a playable preview release:
https://nikitasadkov.itch.io/spell-of-mastery-demo

Suggestions are welcome.

(https://i.imgur.com/PvGTCZY.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Stoddard on February 06, 2019, 05:57:38 pm
Made a playable preview release:
https://nikitasadkov.itch.io/spell-of-mastery-demo

Suggestions are welcome.


Cool! But it looks like you put lib directory instead of src or a link to github into the .zip

Edit: ah, now I get it. It's your own runtime and your own lisp. Very cool.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Meridian on February 06, 2019, 06:44:02 pm
Very nice colors and shades.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 06, 2019, 07:12:05 pm
Cool! But it looks like you put lib directory instead of src or a link to github into the .zip

Edit: ah, now I get it. It's your own runtime and your own lisp. Very cool.
Yeah I'm a big fan of Lisp, so I decided to write game in Lisp. Spell of Mastery is actually my second game. The first one was Warcraft 2 engine implementation in Common Lisp (SBCL). It was fairly complete with working AI and all spells implemented: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k8jkeFfnl0
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 12, 2019, 02:02:09 am
Implemented fire, lightning and explosions burning grass and flammable objects. Also added a bugfixes to the demo at https://nikitasadkov.itch.io/spell-of-mastery-demo

Remaining major features:
1. Collapsing structures. This one require introducing material strengths. Metals can have large overhangs than soil.
2. Water/lava dynamics. Moving water is actually an important tactical feature. Say flooding a cave full of enemies. Or in multiplayer maps player can create bottleneck by flooding trenches. Fantasy setting makes it easy to introduce such feature, because there could be say a flood spell.
3. Passable objects blocking vision, like smoke screen or tall bushes, which could be especially useful to burn down.

(https://i.imgur.com/JW3VU0H.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 14, 2019, 02:51:13 am
Ok. Done implementing fog/tall grass blocking vision. Also fixed a ton of bugs. As always, comments and suggestions are welcome.

(https://i.imgur.com/nL6DjS1.png)

The Fog of War regeneration mechanics is actually allows some choices with various drawbacks. For example, FOW can be regenerated at the end of players turn, at start of player's turn, both at the start and at the end, or when any unit finishes movement. Deciding how to implement FOG of war, I made a pros/cons table (such tables appear to be a common game design instrument).

End of Turn:
- Pros:
  - Player doesn't see enemy movement in territories he left.
  - Player can still see enemies which killed his units or casted Mist.
  - Player can see all terrain he uncovered during this turn. Makes it easier for player to remember stuff. Especially if player loads the game after few days.
  - AI handles it easily, noticing positions of your units.
  - Intuitive.
- Cons:
  - Effects like Mist wont blocking vision won't be immediately noticeable.

Start of Turn:
- Pros:
  - Effects like mist blocking vision will be immediately noticeable.
- Cons:
  - Player can see enemy movement in territories he left.
  - Player can still see all enemy movement in mist until the start of his turn. That will be just an annoyance.
  - Really hard to make AI handle it.
  - Non-intuitive.

Both Start and End of Turn:
- Pros:
  - Some combined pros of both approaches.
- Cons
  - Really hard to make AI handle it.
  - Non-intuitive.

Each time unit finished its movement:
- Pros:
  - Very intuitive.
  - Spells like Mist immediately take effect.
- Cons:
  - Less tactical depth: player cannot move a scout close to uncover enemy units, then move that scout away and nuke the enemy with some area of effect spell, that would otherwise harm the scout.
  - Computationally intensive on large maps.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Yankes on February 14, 2019, 09:28:03 pm
Some thoughts about mist and fire. Overall I think its look bit out of place and do not fit good rest of graphic. It look bit too much diffused compared to rest of sprites.
Overall graphic is nice looking pixel art and this effect look like from some 3D game.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 15, 2019, 07:55:13 pm
Some thoughts about mist and fire. Overall I think its look bit out of place and do not fit good rest of graphic. It look bit too much diffused compared to rest of sprites.
Overall graphic is nice looking pixel art and this effect look like from some 3D game.
There is a number of reasons I decided to use non-pixelart effects.
1. Alpha channel allows to easily show objects inside mist and fire. And blends nicely with any object, as opposed to say dithering. In XCOM artists had to keep flames really small and close to the ground to avoid obscuring units. You just don't get that massive firestorm effect burning trees. Same with mist, which should be the height of a unit to actually block sight, otherwise it will look silly.
2. It is a common practice to use alpha-channel true-color effects in modern pixelart turn-based games, and even in some older, like Age of Wonders (it combines index painted pixelart with pre-rendered graphics), Master of Magic, Magic & Mayhem and Mage Knight Destiny Soldier for GBA.
3. Full color gradients and transparency make special effects stand out.
4. You just cant nicely model mist and fire using pixels. Especially with large sprites. It will have a lot of ugly dithering, and nasty gradient jumps. I also found it much harder to produce good looking pixelart effects.
5. There is a good amount of ready to use true-color stock art effect templates, both free and commercial. Just load them into particle editor and create what you need. In fact, I had to convert a few pixel art effects I took from OpenGameArt into continuous color, because, while the effects were okay, they were looking just wrong with that dithering.
6. I still use pixelart for a few effects, like the magical goblet for bless spell.


Also, there is an indie game called, Waves of Fate, they do use pure pixel art effects in it (down to scary dithering in place of transparency), but it looks okay due to generally non-realistic art style: https://store.steampowered.com/app/467270/Weaves_of_Fate/

Then again, many older pixelart games, like Final Fantasy Tactics, combine everything that works. Although I always thought that FFT's 3d landscape is the ugliest part of the game, after the pre-rendered intro cutscene, which was outsourced to that infamous Russian studio, which made Zelda Phillips CDI games. Still FFT's 3d magic effects were really beautiful, and impossible to achieve with pixelart.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Yankes on February 16, 2019, 01:40:01 am
You did not get exactly my point. I fine with transparency and special effects on graphic, some thing I did:

https://openxcom.org/forum/index.php/topic,1532.30.html
https://openxcom.org/forum/index.php/topic,322.msg4504.html#msg4504
https://openxcom.org/forum/index.php/topic,2059.0.html

I once made default fire semi-transparent in some old branch of OpenXcom.

My point was that graphic used for this effect was too much blurred compare to rest of graphic. Transparency can have impact on this but I do not think this main reason.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 16, 2019, 05:27:17 pm
My point was that graphic used for this effect was too much blurred compare to rest of graphic. Transparency can have impact on this but I do not think this main reason.
Well, it is a fog, it is supposed to be blurry and annoying to players. There are a few spells, like tornado to get rid of it.

Also, implemented rain effect, which would reduce sight, extinguish fires and prevent fire spells from being cast at outside locations. I'm unsure how much and when rain should go. Maybe the rain could be that one place where RNG will be allowed? I really want to avoid RNG and make game as fair as chess, but making it rain every 31st turn would look silly. Obviously rain should be controlled by biome, so there will be no rain in the desert, but a lot of rain in rainforest. Should rain spawn mist? How to spawn mist in deterministic way, without RNG? Then again, what do I know about raining? Or maybe making rain into a spell, casting which would change weather?
(https://i.imgur.com/NyvIq6T.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 18, 2019, 03:30:31 am
Dynamic water - done. In future I will also add lava, which would set nearby objects on fire and cool into stone under rain or in contact with water.

Still these liquid interactions are rather tricky and allow for a lot of possible implementation, with various drawbacks and game design shortcomings.

(https://i.imgur.com/luhKzVH.gif)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 24, 2019, 01:45:00 am
Ooookay. One huge update. Dunno if you people can implement the same in OpenXCOM  :P I'm sure in one thing, with XCOM style map cell format you will have to use different approach.

Version 0.9a changes:
- Smooth fog of war, due to multiple requests. For some reason people were really annoyed by contrast square fog tiles   :-\

Version 0.9 changes:
- Dynamic Water.
- Cataclysm spell to flood your enemies and open a passage through waters. Finally you can play as Moses!
- Tornado spell, which scatters units and removes mist.
- Proper time system, instead of abstract turns. Now every turn models real life hour.
- Night time: every 8 turns out of 24 turns day, from 22:00 to 6:00. Undeads have more defence at night, while units without darkvision have reduced sight.
- Rain, which extinguishes flames in outdoor areas and prevents the use of fire spells, like firestorm and fireball. Units inside rain get -1 to sight.
- Proper wood bridge tile, instead wooden floor.
- Fixed fog sight bug, when cell below or above give units cant be accessed inside fog.
- Fixed bug with invalid empty check, affecting several spells and leading to potential crashes when one creature teleports into another creature.
- Fixed crash hiding drowning unit.

(https://i.imgur.com/OSD4KZ8.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Solarius Scorch on February 24, 2019, 06:11:39 pm
(https://i.imgur.com/luhKzVH.gif)

Does it mean we can blow up parts of the map to drain water? :)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 25, 2019, 02:38:14 am
Does it mean we can blow up parts of the map to drain water? :)

Yup. It would also allow randomly generating puzzles, if water reservoirs are placed randomly. Although soil is really explosion resistant material, unless it is really heavy explosion leaving a crater, so currently I have limited terraforming only to the imp unit, which also digs passages, builds ladders and bridges. In XCOM game that would be a soldier with a shovel (I'm surprised OXC havent implemented trench digging yet). The flood/cataclysm spell was a little overpowered, so I had to reduce ranger and implement accretion time, so AI will have a few turns to move out of the way.

Here I imp below digged under the river, redirecting the flow and drowning in the process.
(https://i.imgur.com/RI9bx8O.gif)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on February 28, 2019, 09:49:53 pm
Done collapsing terrain, killing units caught inside and giving fall damage to the ones standing on top. Still needs some proper animations. IIRC, collapsing multi-floor buildings were major feature of XCOM Apocalypse. I haven't seen them in any other game.
(https://i.imgur.com/0JI93cF.gif)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on March 05, 2019, 10:47:36 pm
Original XCOM engine had somewhat intricate sprite format, requiring artist to carefully split sprites into into multiple cells. That was especially annoying with larger objects, like trees or tanks (dunno if Gollop had some cool algorithm to do that automatically). I just use free form sprites, leading to more complicated draworder algorithm, especially when most humanoids have a height of 2 cubes. I also limit movement direction to north,south,west,east, which requires me to draw sprites only in two directions. Still a lot of routine work.
(https://i.imgur.com/j63HGSl.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on March 05, 2019, 11:07:53 pm
Some interesting notes from original XCOM Apocalypse developer:
http://www.terrygreer.com/xcomapocalyse.html
Quote
The editor was an updated version of the one used for the earlier xcom games.

Every tile was designed to occupy a volume of space. Many tiles had multiple versions showing a succession of destroyed states.

In the description off each tile there was a series of properties such as ‘health value’ and ‘destroyed tile type’. when the health value was eroded away the tile would then be replaced by the ‘destroyed tile type’ (which in turn could have its own health and destroyed type). Chains like this could be as long or short as required. Tiles could of course also bed invulnerable.

This approach meant that potentially anything in the map could be blown apart and destroyed. This was made even more true in Apocalypse as tiles could also be flagged as supportive, and if a supportive tile was destroyed then those above it could also fall.

 

Tiles were complex data structures. Each one also had a reference to line of sight definition – this was a simple 4x4x4 grid – a sort 3d texture – where each cell was either solid or empty. There were a relatively small number of these solid line of sight definitions, but enough to approximate the 3D shape of any shape of tile created. This meant that the world was effectively broken into a 3d voxel grid where weapon fire could be accurately ray-traced. It was a ball ache to set up initially, as every tile had to have a line of sight definition assigned, but really made life easy later on as collision in game then became automatically generated from the map editor.

It was a genius approach, especially in the years before decent 3d raytracing – and one of the key identifying features of an xcom game. Players always loved being able to snipe enemy forces from right across the map through a couple of windows or blown open walls. It’s also a technique which I think useful to reinvent for use in conjunction with true 3D worlds and can think of lots of good mechanics you could use them for.

 

While some mission maps were hand crafted (especially apocalypse and the end missions of every game), many other mission maps in XCom games were made procedurally (especially in the earlier games).

 

The procedural rules would:

  1. Decide on the location type (e.g. farm, port, city etc)

  2. Then, using a look-up table specific to the location type selected a look up table would let a number of small hand crafted sections be chosen at random (though rules would restrict how often each piece could be chosen).

  3. Mix together these sections (with simple rules that specified which sections could be adjacent to which other sections).

The result was a vast number of possible layouts – for all intents and purposes near infinite, and unique to each user.

The procedural nature of these maps made the games feel more personal to each user.

The recent remake eschewed this approach and instead went for a large number of hand crafted maps instead, although with random starting points (which was a shame).

Sadly I don't have screenshots of the tools we used for these isometric games

Were these tools ever made public? Or maybe their code was left in the game's executable?
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Stoddard on March 06, 2019, 12:52:40 am
many thanks for the link.

it only emphasizes why great games are not ever done by big or even medium-sized studios.

editor: no, while i'm sure it's still out there somewhere, it's hopelessly outdated anyway. we have MapView

the rest is documented in ufopaedia.org and the source code.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on March 06, 2019, 11:54:04 am
it only emphasizes why great games are not ever done by big or even medium-sized studios.
Yeah. That Terry Green also designed other cool and innovative games, such as http://www.terrygreer.com/xenomorph.html (a System Shock style game long before System Shock). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKVNnnqyuZY

It was an obvious inspiration for System Shock, down to soundtrack.
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on March 09, 2019, 03:10:11 am
Implemented different biomes. Because you cant have lava without snow :P

Things to do:
- Cell temperature, melting ice/snow and setting objects on fire. Then things like lava and fire could just increase the temperature of creatures caught inside them.
- Air/oxygen. Closed rooms with creatures lose oxygen level, making non-undead creatures to die.
- Lava damaging flyers staying over it (should come with the cell temperature).

Well it is hard keep todo list from growing, because many features come naturally. You need lava damage and convection, you have to implement air and cell temperature. Lava should be really hot inside closed spaces.

(https://i.imgur.com/3kQ1DTn.png)
(https://i.imgur.com/safbafK.png)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Solarius Scorch on March 09, 2019, 01:06:31 pm
Dude, you are insane in the best way possible.

If only you considered dice rolls... ;)
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Yankes on March 09, 2019, 07:26:31 pm
This is too insane :D
Title: Re: XCOM Inspired Fantasy Game
Post by: Nikita_Sadkov on March 14, 2019, 11:38:07 pm
Dude, you are insane in the best way possible.

If only you considered dice rolls... ;)
I do consider them as an option, something like hardcore mode.

Anyway, further work on gas diffusion would be introducing the scent propagation: each scent has a umber of components, and different units emit different proportion of these components. So if you have say a dog on a team, it may sniff the scent of the alien hidding behind the corner. Or you may use it for the usual diffusion based pathfinding, which would reduce the otherwise complex pathfind problem to just O(1). And the scent diffusion is an embarrassingly parallel problem, so in real-time setting one can easily run diffusion on several CPUs, or update diffusion it once in a few game cycles, when there isn't much going on.